Author - Simon Buckingham Shum

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Learning Analytics for 21st Century Competencies?
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Scaffolding deep reflection with automated feedback?
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Gonski? Let’s get serious about school improvement
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Tony Bryk Australian tour kicks off
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Universities: core business (and analytics) in 2030?

Learning Analytics for 21st Century Competencies?

We’re delighted to announce a Special Section of the Journal of Learning Analytics, published this week, focusing on the challenge of Learning Analytics for 21st Century Competencies. In our editorial we introduce the nature of the challenge, and after summarising the different researcher and practitioner papers, propose a complex systems approach which takes seriously the ‘layers, loops and processes’ of learning infrastructures and the iterative relationship between the human and the digital, where people learn at the nodes of networked flows of information. Learning analytics is an emerging field powered by the paradigm shifts of the information age. Pedagogy and learning that produce students capable of thriving in conditions of complexity, risk, and challenge by taking responsibility for their own learning journeys, and using technology and analytics[…]

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Scaffolding deep reflection with automated feedback?

We’ve all got used to the idea that computers can understand writing and speech to some degree — Google adverts that match your search queries… asking Siri simple questions… IBM Watson winning Jeopardy! But how does natural language processing fit into learning that goes beyond getting the right answer to a focused question, or matching some key concepts? Language is clearly front and centre in the way that we learn from others, share our understanding, and narrate to ourselves. However, the idea that computers have any substantive contribution to make to the teaching and assessment of writing elicits strong reactions from educators, and understandably so (learn more from this workshop). In recent work that we’ve been doing at University of Technology Sydney, we’re exploring to what extent text[…]

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Gonski? Let’s get serious about school improvement

Good news: the Prime Minister is reconsidering his government’s decision not to fund the remaining educational reforms recommended in 2011 by the Gonski Report. However, the depressing track record of so many school improvement efforts was highlighted last week when new education minister Simon Birmingham noted: We need to acknowledge that state and federal governments have ploughed lots more money into schools in recent years and with all of that extra money we haven’t necessarily seen improved educational outcomes” […] “There’s far more to getting better outcomes than just putting more money on the table.” And he’s right. New work from Tony Bryk, President of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, in Australia this week, shows just why educational[…]

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Tony Bryk Australian tour kicks off

Ruth, Chris and I are delighted to be hosting Tony Bryk this week, with colleagues at a series of events in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. Tony is the leading figure in the Educational Improvement Science movement, and we look forward to stimulating conversation with colleagues at  the NSW and VIC Departments for Education, and leaders from diverse school contexts. Learn more. . .

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Universities: core business (and analytics) in 2030?

 Ruth and I have the privilege of working with Randy Bass [blog] and team at Georgetown University. Randy is a leading thinker  around the deep purpose of higher education, and how this entails rethinking student qualities, and analytics. Jump to 40mins for his closing comments in this keynote envisaging higher ed in 2030. Here’s the gist: Our calling as a university is the formation of men and women (but many institutions do this of course). However, we do so in the context of a community of enquiry and knowledge creation (fewer institutions do this). Moreover, we do so for the public, common good (fewer still have this explicit mission). These three are interlocked and inseparable. The railroad companies who thought they were in the business of railroads went bust. The ones who thrived understood[…]

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