Archive - April 2013

1
Modelling Learning Dynamics
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Taronga Zoo Break Out
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Learning Power – stories from leaders, teachers and students
4
Design Educational Engineering and Development

Modelling Learning Dynamics

Shaofu Huang presented his doctoral research at a seminar of the Centre for Systems Learning and Leadership on Wednesday 24th April. This is an exciting application of complexity theory and systems modelling in the social sciences and demonstrates that for teachers, engaging students in deep learning is complex and unpredictable – more like a design challenge than a script to be followed.

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Taronga Zoo Break Out

Taronga Zoo Break Out  Taronga Zoo Break out is a  story written by the Indigenous students of Singleton High School for the school Community in Singleton, New South Wales.  It is an example of how  symbol and metaphor can support the development of student self-awareness and engagement in the process of learning.  Developing a rich and local language for learning, that links to the collective consciousness of a community through metaphors and symbols, is a crucial prerequisite for deep inquiry-based learning.  The story was  ratified by the Wonnaruah elders,  illustrations are byKerry-Anne at Black Butterfly Designs and the following people helped in the facilitation of the story writing: Tim Small, Bristol, UK and Deirdre Heitmeyer, Jennifer Campbell and Narelle McCormack of the Ka-Wul Indigenous Education Centre.

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Learning Power – stories from leaders, teachers and students

Hear from users about the impact of Learning Power as assessed by the Effective Lifelong Learning Inventory, on a learning community in the North of England. Research background: Deakin Crick, Ruth (2007) ‘Learning how to learn: the dynamic assessment of learning power’, Curriculum Journal, 18:2, 135 – 153 To link to this article: DOI: 10.1080/09585170701445947

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Design Educational Engineering and Development

How do we improve the quality of Research and Development for school improvement?   Improving the organization of educational R&D requires answers to three seemingly straightforward questions: What problem(s) are we trying to solve? Whose expertise is needed to solve these problems? What are the social arrangements that will enable this work? While these questions appear to be simple, in the last decades our field’s responses to them have been confused. When the answers to these questions are disorganized, the natural result is a cacophony of questions and innovations that fail to accumulate into real progress on core concerns. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teacher Education is pioneering an approach to educational improvement which draws on systems thinking and engineering.  See ‘Building Networked Improvement[…]

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