Archive - May 2011

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Reinventing the Curriculum
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Learning Emergence Launches!
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Rethinking Learning & Leadership – Howard Green
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Complexity, Computing, Contemplation, Learning?

Reinventing the Curriculum

Rosemary Hipkins uses dynamic complexity theory to explain teacher professional learning and leadership. Rose is chief researcher at the New Zealand Council for Educational Research.   Here we present her paper in which she draws on dynamic complexity theory to describe how teachers learned collaborativey and pioneered new approaches to curriculum which stimulate deep learning and engagement. Schools in the Curriculum Implementation Exploratory Studies (CIES) project evolved effective ways for teachers to learn together as they gave effect to The New Zealand Curriculum. Some common patterns were found in the ways learning networks formed within schools and evolved over time as curriculum understanding deepened and learning needs shifted. Ideas about dynamic complexity suggest specific factors to keep in mind as networks of learners are strategically shaped and[…]

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Rethinking Learning & Leadership – Howard Green

The Systems Centre: Learning and Leadership in the University of Bristol’s Graduate School of Education and Faculty of Engineering has launched! Kicking off its expert seminar series was Howard Green, Director of Research and Development at Oasis Academies, formerly Special Adviser on Leadership at the Department of Education, and Visiting Fellow at the Graduate School of Education. “Has the current paradigm for school leadership, with its focus on professional standards and competencies, taken us as far as it can with our efforts to transform schools? How can systems thinking and processes help us to find answers to some of the complex problems that remain unresolved and often block further progress in schools? The seminar will stimulate thinking and discussion about[…]

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Complexity, Computing, Contemplation, Learning?

Beyond conscious rationality All of my work has been around harnessing the digital world to get us to go beyond the surface and think more deeply. Up till now this has been largely focused on rational modes of thinking, inquiry and sensemaking — hence all the stuff on argumentation, dialogue/debate mapping and hypermedia. However, we are more than rational beings, and we know an increasing amount about the central role of the unconscious in dealing creatively with complex dilemmas that seem not to yield to conscious effort. I’ve touched on this a bit but it’s certainly been second fiddle adding harmonies to the primary melody. For instance, having been profoundly impressed, and moved, by Adam Kahane’s conflict resolution work (Solving[…]

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